Features

Features  Volume 2 Issue 5 (july-Aug 2017)

The 1940s

Kanu Gandhi, was the nephew of Mahatma Gandhi and the manager at his Sabarmati Ashram. He started photographing Bapu in the late 1930s with a Rolleiflex until his death in 1948. What transpired from this was a collection of hundreds of rare photographs of Gandhi in his day to day personal life during the quest for Indian independence.

Henri Cartier Bresson, came to India in 1947 as Magnum Photo’s Asia correspondent witnessing the independence and also the partition, the greatest exodus in the history of the world. He was the founding member of the agency which was set up in 1947 and captured some of the most important moments in India’s history and returned to India over and over again during his photographic career.

HCB1947007W00014-34
© Henri Cartier Bresson

The 1950s

Homai Vyarawalla, the first female photojournalist of India started her career in the 1930s and went on to photograph national leaders like Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru all throughout the struggle and years later after independence. Publishing under her pseudonym ‘Dalda 13’ she remained anonymous for years and maintained a simple lifestyle influenced by the Mahatma.

In 1948 TS Satyan, started his professional career with the Deccan Herald documenting the new born nation. Dubbed by many as the ‘Father of photojournalism in India,’ his work incorporates not only the famous personalities of those eras but the common populace of India. He once said, “[..]Call it intimate intrusions, but it is these simple, ordinary people who dominate my oeuvre.”

T.S Satyan:Tasveer
© TS Satyan

The 1960s

Jyoti Bhatt, is a modernist Indian artist best known for his paintings and printmaking that includes intaglios etchings and screen prints. Also known for his photography, he greatly documented the disappearing rural Indian art and culture and indigenous artists like Sankho Chaudhari.

Richard Bartholomew, Richard Bartholomew was not only of an art critic but also a writer, poet, photographer and curator. Between the 50s and the 70s, he documented life of artists and his surroundings through photography. His pictures intimately portrayed his family and his circle of artist friends and associates and his travels in India and the US.

Photo credit: RICHARD BARTHOLOMEWAll rights reserved. For permission and licensing rights: PLEASE CONTACT: pablo@bartholomew.tvOr by cellphone +91 98100 14131
© Richard Bartholomew

Madan Mahatta, studied photography in England and between 1950s and 1980s documented the height of Nehruvian modernism. He also captured the development of New Delhi in association with many of his friends from architectural background.

The 1970s

Kishor Parekh, was an Indian photojournalist born in Bhavnagar, Gujarat, and studied filmmaking and documentary photography at the University of Southern California. Parekh is best known for his work on the Bangladesh Liberation War of 1971. His book on the subject, Bangladesh: A Brutal Birth, was covered the atrocities of Pakistani army and the suffering of the native Bengali population. The Indian government commissioned 20,000 copies of the book to raise awareness of the war

Kishor Parekh
© Kishor Parekh

Raghu Rai, Raghu Rai is an Indian photographer and photojournalist who career spans five decades. In 1977 he was appointed by Henri Cartier-Bresson into Magnum Photos in 1977.With his extensive coverage he has produced more than 18 books and his photo essays have appeared in many magazines and newspapers including Time, Life, GEO, The New York Times, Sunday Times, Newsweek, The Independent, and the New Yorker

The 1980s

Pablo Bartholomew, is an award-winning Indian photojournalist and an independent photographer based in New Delhi, India. From 1984 until 2000, Bartholomew was represented by the French-American news photo agency, Gamma Liaison during which time he primarily covered conflicts and developments in the South Asian region. His photographs were published in New York Times, Newsweek, Time, Business Week, National Geographic, GEO, Der Spiegel, Figaro, Paris Match, The Telegraph, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Guardian, and Observer Magazine, among others.

Ram Rahman, is a contemporary Indian Photographer and a founding member of the Safdar Hashmi Memorial Trust (SAHMAT) in New Delhi, a leader in the resistance to communal and sectarian forces in India through its public cultural action. Ram Rahman is one of the leading photographers in Project 365, a public photo art project that creates and preserves photographic visuals of the fast changing ancient culture and lifestyle of the tri-sangam territory of ancient Tamilakam.

Ram Rahman
© Ram Rahman

The 1990s

With a career spanning over 25 years Swapan Parekh is widely acclaimed to have brought the documentary aesthetics to advertising photography whilst simultaneously pursuing contemporary bodies of personal autonomous work. He has studied photojournalism and documentary photography at the International Center of Photography New York. After early years of documentary photography over the last two decades, he is now doing his personal work both in color and black and white.

Swapan Parekh
© Swapan Parekh

The 2000s

Pushpamala N. is a photography and visual artist born and based in Bangalore. She is formally trained as a sculptor but shifted to photography to explore her interest in narrative figuration. Her work has been described as performance photography, as she frequently uses herself as model in her own work. Using prevalent contemporary topics she uses herself to represent and create a narrative that explores places, gender and history.

Pushpamala N.
© Pushpamala N

The 2010s

With the popularization and accessibility of digital photography in the late 2000s, the decade of 2010 visually flourished with photographers like Amirtharaj Stephen, Ishan Tankha, Prashant Panjiar, Vineet Vohra, Amit Pasricha, Vikram Bawa, Mahesh Shantaram, Vinay Panjwani, Senthil Kumaran, Javed Dar, Syed Shahriyar and Vivek Nigam.

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Features  Volume 2 Issue 4(May-June 2017)

The Masters: America

Philippe Halseman,  an electrical engineer by education, discovered photography after finding his father’s camera and developing glass plates in the family’s bathroom sink. Halsman came to be known for his ‘psychological portraiture’ as he became more and more immersed in his practice. He spoke of his fascination for the human face, which came from a deeply rooted child-like curiosity in people. Every expression, every nod of the head, every twitch of the eye revealed so much about a person, that it ought to be reflected in their portraits.

Professional Photography magazine

Portfolio

In this feature we present to you the works of two of the most accomplished portrait photographers of India: Rohit Chawla and Bandeep Singh. Along with sharing their work, they share their journey in an exclusive conversation with us.

Recognized as a leading contemporary photographer, Rohit Chawla started his career and spent close to two decades in advertising at JWT before eventually moving out to start his own design and film production company.
He has worked as an editor at India Today and OPEN and has 168 covers of India Today to his credit.

Bandeep Singh is the Photo Editor at Fortune India. A self-taught photographer he has worked as the Photo Editor of India Today in the past. His photograph of Baba Ramdev doing a yaga asan on India Today’s cover went viral in 2016.Photography reference guide, books

Conceptual: See And Find Beauty

Samane Gholamnejad, b. September 1984 has received an Associate’s Degree in news photography and a bachelor in English literature. She works as a photographer with national newspapers and news agencies. In this issue of Creative Image magazine she takes us on a journey of Find and See Beauty. A journey of how vivid cultures give birth to a deep insight into the meaning of beauty.

Photostory: Jannatul Mawa

Close Distance is a photo story of middle class housewives and domestic servants in Bangladesh. It explores the relationship between both sets of women coming from different classes of society—social and economical, the contrast and the similarities between them along with the bond they share in a patriarchal society.

Jannatul Mawa is a documentary photographer based in Dhaka. She turned to professional photography after years of working as a social activist.

Special Feature

Photography is all about contemplation, conceptualization and experimentation. In this issue, we bring to you the musings of some of the most inspiring portrait photographers like Serena Chopra, Bikramjit Bose, Ashish Shah, Lukas Vasilikos etc.

Artists on Art: Anjolie Ela Menon

This issue looks at the work of famous artist Anjolie Ela Menon, a painter for almost 60 years now. We explore her journey from her childhood, her experiences and her work.

The Archives: Edward S Curtis

In this issue we look at the historical work of Edward s Curtis (b. 1868), an American photographer and ethnologist. His extensive work on the American West and on Native American people gives us an insight into portrait photography of the 1800s. Through his work Curtis’ point of view was to share with the viewers a glimpse of the cultures that were vanishing away.

Creative Explorations With Raghu Rai

We take you with us on the first ever travel photography workshop with Raghu Rai in Anandpur Sahib to experience Hola Mohalla through the viewfinders of our twelve selected participants from all over the world.

Virtual Vantage

Handpicked from our Instagram, #creativeimagemagazine, we bring to you some of the finest photographs in this issue. Use #creativeimagemagazine in your posts to make your photographs discoverable to get a chance to get featured in our next print issue!

Through our social media collaboration with them we give stage to talented photographs. Only the best images are published that are selected by our chief editor, Mr Raghu Rai.

Throughout life we are presented with endless examples in which individuals and groups have been excluded from communities based on appearances, beliefs and actions. When this happens, there must always be two, those who impose standards, the decision makers, the ‘included’, and those they exclude. Communication can be used to both connect and divide, evolve and regress, educate and destroy. Inclusion is, therefore, engaging someone in a dialogue, but not necessarily a verbal one. In her photographic series, Cast No Evil, Alia Ali invites the viewer to analyze their subjective perception in regards to inclusion and exclusion, and the threshold in which the transition between the two occurs. What are the perimeters that define each?

Creative IMAGE is on Instagram! We’re looking for the photographic brilliance that lies in layers of the social platform. Use #creativeimagemagazine in your posts to make your photographs discoverable, and they just might get featured in our next print issue!
Through social media collaborations with Camarena on Facebook and India Pictures on Instagram in this issue, Creative IMAGE gives stage to talented photographers.

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Features  Volume 2 Issue 3(March-April 2017)

The Masters: America

Morath’s photographs show an invariable intimate relationship with her subjects. It is as if her work is an ongoing series of observations, memories, and experiences of the life she made for herself. Her poetic and somewhat theatrical depiction of elegance make her portraits of women stand out. “It’s a certain kind of appreciation of lovely things that she had that was particular to her time,” said her daughter, Rebecca Miller. Morath’s portrayal of the female is refreshing, that challenges the male gaze in photography. In her photos, the story of womanhood becomes intriguing and urgent.

Festival Preview

Photographing the Female is a transnational project and exhibition exploring female identity and representation in photography through the lens of contemporary image-makers. Formed to reflect the diverse state, condition and role of the female around the world today, we are using the power of photography to inspire new ways of seeing and start conversation! We give you an exclusive dip into the curatorial journey of Sarah Hoilund, which forms a major part of the Focus Festival in Mumbai. These images bring together the perceptions of modern female-hood in new ways as they comment on different social and personal realities through recognizable themes like gender roles, body ideals, motherhood and stereotypes.

Photostory: Abdollah Heidari

School fires in Iran are not uncommon, and cause the deaths of dozens of students. There have been six blazes that have engulfed schools since 1997 where several teachers and more than a hundred students have received burns. In a girls school of a far border village Shin Abad in northwestern Iran, defects in the heating system caused the biggest school blaze in Iran lead to the death of two students and severe burns in many others. Abdollah Heidari’s photostory is a poignant portrayal of the disaster as he photographs the victims.

Special Feature

We glance through the photographs of women from everyday life by Masoud Gharaei, Zacharie Rabehi, Elnaz Amini, Hulya Polat, Ashoke Ghosh. We explore intricacies of womanhood, sexuality, and culture.

In her book Let There Be Light, Melisa Teo explains how she uses her camera to feed her curiosity and escape from feelings of restlessness, fear, and boredom. The surreal visuals provide an in depth insight into her photographic style and creative process. In this issue, Teo takes the reader on a spiritual journey through her “third eye”: her camera.

Photobook

Passport is a compilation by Alexandr Chekmenev of photographs shot during this national passportisation campaign in Luhansk, a town in southeast of Ukraine, in 1994-1995. Enveloped in reflections of what he saw and how he felt, Chekmenev brings to life Passport—part memoir, part eulogy for the people with whom he got acquainted over a brief yet emotional period of time. It is a poignant insight into the lives of the common people: old, infi rm, and waiting for their inevitable end in the war-torn region.

Artist on Art: Francis Newton Souza

Ever one to question social convention and norms, Souza’s art was reflective of his strong ideals. It was not concerned with representation of truth, with questions of style and tradition, with problems of nationalism and modernism. His fundamental aim was to challenge the way art was commonly seen and understood, to redefine it, and to expand the horizons of the art scene in India—and so he did. Souza’s nude women are one of the predominant themes appearing in his work throughout his career. Owing to his curiosity, Souza grew up to become more and more fascinated with the female form, which explicitly and boldly featured as art. Souza’s nudes are unashamed of their nakedness, comfortable with their natural state, often looking straight at the viewer or locked in a libidinous embrace.

Archives: Parisa Damandan

During one of her visits back to Isfahan, Parisa Damandan met Vahan, the photographer who had taken photos of her throughout her childhood. She delved into his entire archival collection: thousands of glass-plate negatives—portraits from the photo studio—arranged on shelves in cardboard boxes. Damandan managed to amass more than 20,000 original copies and negatives. We showcase some of the portraits of women from this collection. Interestingly, It was the choice of these women themselves to go to the photographer’s shop and sit in front of the camera, and they chose their own garments, makeup, appearance and image. In some cases, displaying new outfits could serve as a reason for women to go to the studios. It was empowerment served with quirkiness, freedom coupled with fun.

In this issue, we take the readers on a walk through galleries in Delhi which showcased bodies of work by various photographers. ‘Art Zone’ at Pullman, a photo-exhibition presented by Art and Aesthetic curated works of Nitin Rai, Claudia Sanchez De La Barquera, Paresh Maity, Nabarun Mookerjee, among others. ‘Photo OK Please’ at Lalit Kala Akademi presented photographs shot on mobile phone by Sumit Dayal, Altaf Qadri, Chandan Khanna, Anurag Banerjee, Monica Tewari, among others.

Conceptual: Alia Ali

Throughout life we are presented with endless examples in which individuals and groups have been excluded from communities based on appearances, beliefs and actions. When this happens, there must always be two, those who impose standards, the decision makers, the ‘included’, and those they exclude. Communication can be used to both connect and divide, evolve and regress, educate and destroy. Inclusion is, therefore, engaging someone in a dialogue, but not necessarily a verbal one. In her photographic series, Cast No Evil, Alia Ali invites the viewer to analyze their subjective perception in regards to inclusion and exclusion, and the threshold in which the transition between the two occurs. What are the perimeters that define each?

Social Media

Handpicked from our Instagram, #creativeimagemagazine, we bring to you some of the finest photographs in this issue. Use #creativeimagemagazine in your posts to make your photographs discoverable, and they just might get featured in our next print issue!

Throughout life we are presented with endless examples in which individuals and groups have been excluded from communities based on appearances, beliefs and actions. When this happens, there must always be two, those who impose standards, the decision makers, the ‘included’, and those they exclude. Communication can be used to both connect and divide, evolve and regress, educate and destroy. Inclusion is, therefore, engaging someone in a dialogue, but not necessarily a verbal one. In her photographic series, Cast No Evil, Alia Ali invites the viewer to analyze their subjective perception in regards to inclusion and exclusion, and the threshold in which the transition between the two occurs. What are the perimeters that define each?

Creative IMAGE is on Instagram! We’re looking for the photographic brilliance that lies in layers of the social platform. Use #creativeimagemagazine in your posts to make your photographs discoverable, and they just might get featured in our next print issue!
Through social media collaborations with Camarena on Facebook and India Pictures on Instagram in this issue, Creative IMAGE gives stage to talented photographers.

Collaboration

With an overwhelming participation and over 2500 entries for this bimonthly contest, Creative Image magazine and Indiapictures proudly announce the winners who showcased sheer creativity and mindfulness in the portrayal of the idea and feeling of Faith through their photographs. The contest was judged and the photographs handpicked by Mr. Raghu Rai from our Instagram feed under #CIXIP to bring to you the best.

Handpicked from our Instagram, #creativeimagemagazine, we bring to you some of the finest photographs in this issue. Use #creativeimagemagazine in your posts to make your photographs discoverable, and they just might get featured in our next print issue!

Throughout life we are presented with endless examples in which individuals and groups have been excluded from communities based on appearances, beliefs and actions. When this happens, there must always be two, those who impose standards, the decision makers, the ‘included’, and those they exclude. Communication can be used to both connect and divide, evolve and regress, educate and destroy. Inclusion is, therefore, engaging someone in a dialogue, but not necessarily a verbal one. In her photographic series, Cast No Evil, Alia Ali invites the viewer to analyze their subjective perception in regards to inclusion and exclusion, and the threshold in which the transition between the two occurs. What are the perimeters that define each?

Creative IMAGE is on Instagram! We’re looking for the photographic brilliance that lies in layers of the social platform. Use #creativeimagemagazine in your posts to make your photographs discoverable, and they just might get featured in our next print issue!
Through social media collaborations with Camarena on Facebook and India Pictures on Instagram in this issue, Creative IMAGE gives stage to talented photographers.

Showcase

With more than 4 lakh entries from over 1 lakh participants, only a handful of the best images were nominated in Camarena Academy Photography Awards, 2016 in Street & Daily Life, Landscape, Travel, Portrait & Moods, Nature & Wildlife, and Wedding categories. We showcase the winning photographs in our feature!

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Features  Volume 2 Issue 2(Jan-Feb 2017)

The Master’s Angle

“My photography is a reflection, which comes to life in action and leads to meditation. Spontaneity–the suspended moment–intervenes during action, in the viewfinder.”
This issue brings forth the frankness in Magnum photographer
Abbas’ work from India, God’s I’ve Seen, which takes the reader on a journey through Hinduism, hinting on the peculiarity of human nature through spontaneous and exalting visuals.

The Archives

Taking a plunge into 19 Century Russian photography, we explore the works of Maxim Petrovich Dmitriev who laid the foundations of russian photo-reporting. His photographs from Volga Collections, shot over a period of ten years, reflect the turbulent religious and socio-political scenario of Russia. Inclusive of photographs from everyday city life, Dmitriev’s archives showcase pilgrims, monks, monasteries, and Old Believers through straightforward visuals which provides a glimpse of faith in by-gone days.

The Buddhist Spell

In this issue, we rediscover the simplicity in Chinese photographer Yang Yankang’s photo essay about Tibetan Buddhists. Yankang, much like a visual poet, accentuates the ethereality of Buddhism through photographs of fleeting moments and everyday practices. According to Yankang, the Tibetan horizon is divine in nature, and so is reiterated in his body of work.

Photobook

In her book Let There Be Light, Melisa Teo explains how she uses her camera to feed her curiosity and escape from feelings of restlessness, fear, and boredom. The surreal visuals provide an in depth insight into her photographic style and creative process. In this issue, Teo takes the reader on a spiritual journey through her “third eye”: her camera.

Faith As We Know It

In this issue, we celebrate the different perspectives of faith around the globe in a spread of photographs by Natan Dvir who explores how religion shapes societies and fuels fear in people, Maciej Dakowicz who reflects everyday faith through his street photographs, Francis Meslet who photographs places of worship that were doomed into oblivion, and Kazi Mushfiq Hossain from Bangladesh. The issue also showcases the works of Indian photographers like Arka Datta, Swapnil Jedhe, Arnab Adak, Avishek Das, Joydeep Mukherjee, Rohit Gautam, and Amit and Naroop through compelling visuals.

Artist on Art

England born photographer Neil Chowdhury pursues his explorations of his Indian father’s homeland in this section of the issue. Intrigued by, yet ignorant of, India’s culture and history, Neil set out on an adventure to witness and take part in “post-colonial battles playing themselves out on a domestic scale”. This section shows Neil’s take on spirituality, faith, and their changing meanings in the subcontinent.

Gallery Walk

In this issue, we take the readers on a walk through galleries in Delhi which showcased bodies of work by various photographers. ‘Art Zone’ at Pullman, a photo-exhibition presented by Art and Aesthetic curated works of Nitin Rai, Claudia Sanchez De La Barquera, Paresh Maity, Nabarun Mookerjee, among others. ‘Photo OK Please’ at Lalit Kala Akademi presented photographs shot on mobile phone by Sumit Dayal, Altaf Qadri, Chandan Khanna, Anurag Banerjee, Monica Tewari, among others.

Virtual Vantage

Creative IMAGE is on Instagram! We’re looking for the photographic brilliance that lies in layers of the social platform. Use #creativeimagemagazine in your posts to make your photographs discoverable, and they just might get featured in our next print issue!
Through social media collaborations with Camarena on Facebook and India Pictures on Instagram in this issue, Creative IMAGE gives stage to talented photographers.

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Features  Volume 2 Issue 1(Nov-Dec 2016)

Exploring The Masters of Photography

“I am forever chasing light. Light turns the ordinary into the magical.”—
Trent Parke
In our seventh issue, which is dedicated to the unpredictability of life magazine and photography, we present to you the works of Trent Parke. His awe-inspiring work takes us on a journey of inspiration and magic. His images reflect a certain grace and depth of intuitive delight.

Best magazine on contemporary photography

The Indian Perspective

Swapan Parekh gives us a chance to be a part of his search, his experiences and mysteries. His work brings us to a stand still where silence has its own language, that absorbs us and stimulates us in it’s own beautiful way.

Photographer’s guide book

The Archives

Exploring the world of Ikko Narahara , with his black and white, Japanesque expression. His work constantly questions the idea of culture and future in the wake of Japan’s post-war reality. Ikko Narahara was one of the few photographers to embrace the modern Japanese tradition of photography which found it’s contemporary own language, sufficiently distinct from the aesthetic and practice in the west.

A Poem, A Diary, A Therapy…

Igor Pisuk , his new beginning of life, as he comes out of his eight-year long alcohol addiction. His feelings and the chaos in his head expressed through his photographs. In his series ‘Deceitful Reverence’, he puts across his visions, emotions and dreams from his present and his past.

Into The World of The Unpredictable

We take you to experience the unseen and the unknown through the varied interpretations of some astonishing young contemporaries. They take you through their unique perceptions of moments that are silently magical. Among featured photographers are Zishaan Akbar Latif, Ali Shams, Nirvair Singh Rai…

Artist on Art

This issue looks at the work of artist and photographer Ashita Majumdar.
She creates surrealistic, dreamlike visuals by creating photomontages with various images from her visual bank of photographs collected over the years.
Her work is an assimilation of meaningfully chosen elements put together which is wondrously beautiful.

Decoding a Photo Festival

Indian Photography Festival organized in the city of Hyderabad, spread over 11 days, 22 shows and some of the best professional magazine and aspiring photographers from all around the world including Johannes-Reinhart, Gigi Cifali, Sandra Hoyn, Anushree Fadnavis amongst others. Amit Mehra, the curator of the show talks to us about the festival and shares his experience of curating it. Aquin Mathews, the festival director and his team successfully pulled off a grand photo festival with some very inspiring talks, workshops and exhibitions.

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Features  Volume 1 Issue 6(Sep-Oct 2016)

About The Master

In our sixth issue, dedicated to war photography, we present to you the works of Dimitri Baltermants, one of the greatest war photographers of all time. The most striking and characteristic aspect in Baltermants’ photographs of conflict is the non-linear narrative and a deviation from the orderly. The reflection of his poetic heart is what sets apart one’s experience of encountering his work.

The Indian Perspective

Altaf Qadri gives us a chance to experience the Kashmiri Conflict from an insider’s perspective. In this section, we share with you his experiences, his journey as a photojournalist, and his relationship with his homeland—Kashmir, in his own words.

THE ARCHIVES

In this issue, we take a look at the historical works of Alexander Gardner and Mathew Brady, the first American photographers to unblinkingly portray the fearful human cost of war. By photographing the Union and Confederate dead during the American Civil War, they shattered the romantic notion that the larger populace still harbored of war, and brought them face to face with its harsh reality. We explore the extraordinary stories of Brady and Gardner through the words of Geoffrey C Ward, our consulting editor for this issue.

ARTISTS ON ART

This issue looks at the works of artist and art critic Rollie Mukherjee , who explores the Kashmiri conflict through different mediums in art. We share with you her concern and urge to communicate the pain and suffering of the Kashmiris. As we read her self-worded narrative, we realise how the situation in Kashmir has changed over the past month.

EXPLORING THE AFGHAN TRAGEDY

We take you through the journey of renowned photojournalist Paula Bronstein and her work on Afghanistan. We present to you more than 10 years of her experience, amalgamated in the form of a book where she explores the country, both in states of fear and hope. This time, we have the privilege of a dual perspective—one as her own account of experiences, and the second as a review of her book.

UNDERSTANDING CONFLICT AND WAR

War continues to exist and destroy. As it continues to inflict pain and exist infinitely as a relentless tragedy, photojournalists strive to uncover the truth and keep us informed through a vision of the world unseen and unknown by many. In one such account. Emad Nassar , a Palestinian photojournalist helps us understand the plight of Israel-Gaza conflict through his visual explorations. ‘Life In War’, a project by Majid Saeedi helps us understand war not just in the sense of war, but as the life around it, which could be both, it’s cause and effect. We present to you testimonies from different parts of the world through unique perspectives of some of the best photojournalists known.

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Features  Volume 1 Issue 5(July– August 2016)

About The Master

In our fifth issue, which is on the theme of ‘The Wild World’, we present to you the surrealistic and ambitious project of Nick Brandt which strives to present wildlife of East Africa in a way which mirrors the concerns it faces in today’s industrial development minded world. Through his own words, we come to know more about this project and what inspired him to take it up.

The Indian Perspective

We look at the 40 year long career of Rajesh Bedi and how his love for the animals combined with his relationship with the camera, enabling him to become a conservationist-photographer and how his work brings to the fore an underlying sensitivity in the documentation of wildlife.

Passing on the Tradition

We present the work of Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols on the ‘Serengeti Lions’ of Tanzania and learn more about his experience of photographing them using some of the most intricate technologies available today. We also look at photographs by Steve Winter who assisted Nick Nichols for a time before venturing out on his own and combining his photography passion with his skills as a journalist, resulting in not just a photographic portrait of an animal but also telling the story of its existence.

Exploring the world of the wild

In this feature, we aim to showcase the diversity of wildlife across the world along with the manifold issues that plague them today – from exploitation of their habitats to extinction of their species. Through the eyes of 12 photographers from around the world, we explore the majestic and astounding world of the wild.

Decoding Yet Another New Photo Festival

Matheran Green Festival was held at the small hill station of Matheran in the heart of Maharashtra from 13th to 31st May 2016. Organized by Matheran Pratisthan and New Bombay Design, the festival showcased photography exhibitions organized in the midst of nature leading to new and varied ways of looking at photographs and gallery designs. Entries were specially invited for the festival and showcased photographers like Vlad Sokhin, Asmita Parelkar and Masood Sarwer.

A preview – Indian Wildlife Trilogy

Valmik Thapar is a well-known authority on wildlife in India and has helmed more than twenty books on the theme. He is also a celebrated conservationist and has been a part of many governmental drives for the same. This issue of CI provides a preview into his latest offering – a set of three books chronicling the diversity of India’s wildlife through photographs as well as text by some well-known names. We also present Mr. Thapar’s views and suggestions regarding wildlife conservation in India and the many pitfalls it must win over to succeed in making any positive changes.

The Archives

In this issue of the magazine, we look at the historical work by George Shiras III. He is credited as being the first wildlife photographer who, despite the paucity of technology, managed to create stunning portraits of animals in the nighttime. We explore the extraordinary career of ‘Grandfather Flash’ through the words of our consulting editor for this issue, Geoffrey C Ward

Artist on Art

This issue looks at the work of famous artist Manjit Bawa and the compassionate relationship portrayed between human beings and animals, reminiscent of a time gone by, in his paintings. We explore his childhood, the time he spent with animals and his training as an artist and how it all helped him in creating his artistic language and themes as a whole.

Appreciating Emerging Talent

Sharing the work of talented new and upcoming photographers is a way of observing the world with new eyes. We present to you the winning entries from Creative Image and Gionee India’s photo contest ‘Shine with metal’.

Contribute

We wish to provide a platform to talented and innovative contemporary photographers and artists. Along with portfolios of individual images and powerful picture stories, we will welcome any experience that speaks of another kind of understanding—work that has a visual structure that is entirely its own. This could even be a moment from a family album, an offbeat self-portrait, a travel image, an idea born out of a technological experiment or even a selfie. The aim is to reach out and share one’s visual experiences. To be published in this magazine, you don’t have to be a professional photographer. The idea is to demonstrate that you have the ability to put your heart into an image that conveys its own momentum. Please send us your work at info@creativeimagemagazine.com

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Features Volume 1 Issue 4 (May– June 2016)

Exploring the Masters of Photography

In our fourth issue, which is dedicated to Daily Life, we present to you the works of Steve McCurry, who believes himself fortunate for witnessing India transform and grow, and presents in a book titled The Spirit of India, the fragments dearest to him.
Forty years ago, one man embarked on the journey to document rural and folk art of the remote villages of our country, before these artforms vanished. This would end up becoming his life’s journey—one that he would merge with various other explorations. We speak to Jyoti Bhatt and learn about the perception of photography as an art form and his aversion for labels.

Tracing the Course of Daily Life

Our daily lives are a testament to human history, but, we consider them mundane, commonplace and not particularly remarkable. Most moments from the everyday are lost in the throngs of billions of people. But, unbeknownst to all of us, move unseen witnesses who record this, our daily testament. In this feature, we present to you 33 such images from 24 photographers across Asia. The idea is to simply show you our shared human experience, and the streets and songs that echo across countries and oceans.

Decoding Yet Another New Photo Festival

The Gujarat Photo Festival, held at the Satya Art Gallery, Ahmedabad from 31 March 2016 to 3 April 2016, was organised by Niharika, an Ahmedabad-based photography club, one of the oldest in the city. The festival aimed to show works such as those of Kishor Parekh, Fawzan Husain, Amit Mehra, Ganesh Shankar, besides images from various clubs and photography students, a host of talks, book launches, and workshops. We take a look at this new addition to the roster.

Issues that Affect Us

In every issue of the magazine, we shall also keep a watch on the larger issues of our time. And so, we have a first-person account of the aftermath of the Kolkata flyover crash from a young photographer, who was on the site of the unfortunate incident soon after.

Making Phoneographs

In every issue of the magazine, we shall also keep a watch on the larger issues of our time. And so, we have a first-person account of the aftermath of the Kolkata flyover crash from a young photographer, who was on the site of the unfortunate incident soon after.Yes, that’s what we call cellphone photographs! For every DSLR user, there are perhaps ten cellphone users who also take photography very seriously. Our aim is to showcase the best work being produced with cellphones. This issue, we bring to you the people and stories that Mumbai-based Anushree Fadnavis encounters during her daily travels on the local train.

Critiquing Exhibitions

Spaces that showcase photography are important as well as necessary. Each space has its own way of presenting an artist’s work, and each exhibition is as much a medium of expression as the photographs themselves. This time, we take a look at Rajesh Vora’s current exhibition, Everyday Baroque, which explores strange ‘installations’ on the roofs of houses across the hinterlands of Punjab.

The Archives

The World in the 1910s
Every issue, we’re going to be looking at important historical and archival images that show us the life lived within a bygone era. In this issue, we focus on life in the 1910s, as recorded by the G G Bains News Service and made available to the public by the Library of Congress.

Contribute

We wish to provide a platform to talented and innovative contemporary photographers and artists. Along with portfolios of individual images and powerful picture stories, we will welcome any experience that speaks of another kind of understanding—work that has a visual structure that is entirely its own. This could even be a moment from a family album, an offbeat self-portrait, a travel image, an idea born out of a technological experiment or even a selfie. The aim is to reach out and share one’s visual experiences. To be published in this magazine, you don’t have to be a professional photographer. The idea is to demonstrate that you have the ability to put your heart into an image that conveys its own momentum. Please send us your work at

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Features Volume 1 Issue 3(Mar – Apr 2016)

Exploring the Masters of Photography

In our third issue, which is dedicated to landscape photography, we present to you the works of Ansel Adams, whose breathtaking views of the wild beauty of the American West established landscape photography as a fine art form in its own right.

Highlighting Never Before Seen Vistas

The sheer visual pleasure granted by the form, textures, contours and the

amazing colour quality of Earth as seen through satellite and radar imagery, finds expression in a special feature of the photographs of the European Space
Agency
. Also present in the issue are Edward Burtynsky’s aerial views of towns,
settlements and mines—living proofs and examples of how industrialisation and
booming populations have created their own kind of landscape.

Tracing the Landscape of the Mind

One of the most unpredictable, strange and surreal landscapes is that of the mind, and so, we take a look at the deeply personal work of Susan Burstine, who
turned to painting, as a child and later to photography, as a means to deal with
the night terrors caused by traumatic incidents.

Wandering through Stormy Landscapes

Editing and creating this issue took us through many unusual and unpredictable
interpretations of the subject… such as in the case of Mitch Dobrowner, a photographer who only chases fleeting storms to freeze them on film and recreate some of the most dizzying and awe-inspiring visuals. We have an opinion piece looking at Nilüfer Demir’s image of Alan Kurdi and the impact it has had across the world.

Looking at Contemplative Work

Photography is all about contemplation, conceptualisation, and experimentation. In this issue, we bring to you the musings of Soumitra Dutta and Debraj Chakraborty, both of whom consider nature a most inspiring muse.

Making Phoneographs

Yes, that’s what we call cellphone photographs! For every DSLR user, there are perhaps ten cellphone users who also take photography very seriously. Our aim is to showcase the best work being produced with cellphones. This issue, we bring to you the unusual landscapes of Koshi Nishijima, who shows us another side of Japan.

Critiquing Exhibitions

Spaces that showcase photography are important as well as necessary. Each space has its own way of presenting an artist’s work, and each exhibition is as much a medium of expression as the photographs themselves. This time, we showcase the third part of Shahidul Alam’s tribute to indigenous rights activist Kalpana Chakma’s struggles.

The Archives

Every issue, we’re going to be looking at an important historical personality from India or from the subcontinent and take a look at their life through archival images. In this issue, Rahaab Allana, in an excerpt, briefly traces the history of landscape photography in India.

Appreciating Emerging Talent

More than being avenues for competition, photography contests are a great pool from which to harness talent, and to observe how ways of seeing around the country are changing. We present to you the cream of the crop from the Creative Image and Gionee India cellphone photo contest as well as the Camarena Academy Photography Awards.

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Features Volume 1 Issue 2(Jan – Feb 2016)

Exploring the Masters of Photography

In each issue our attempt will be to appreciate the Masters with a fresh perspective, to serve the new generation something they may have missed out on amidst the chaos of online information. While our main focus will naturally be on the work of Indian and Asian photographers, we would also include Masters from across the world.

In our second issue, we bring you a sample of the works of Richard Avedon, one of the most iconic names in fashion, and a man whose aesthetic was not subject to the narrow confines of genre.

Amongst Indian Masters, we bring to you Prabuddha Dasgupta, the photographer who brought in a breath of fresh air to the commercial scene in India, and whose personal work ranks amongst the strongest to have been produced in the country.

Highlighting Talent and Aesthetic

Contemporary, young photographers are the ones who are ultimately going to take the baton forward. And so, we are featuring nine such established as well promising names in a unique feature that aims to look at the fashion aesthetic prevalent in India.

Looking at Conceptual Work

Photography is all about experimentation and conceptualisation. The execution of innovative concepts that have a strong idea behind them, is something that excites us and so, we present to you noted fashion designer JJ Valaya’s series, Decoded Paradox. The series contextualises historical characters in ordinary, daily life, and gives us a surreal glimpse of the royal and the mundane.

Making Phoneographs

Yes, that’s what we call cellphone photographs! For every DSLR user, there are perhaps ten cellphone users who also take photography very seriously. Our aim is to showcase the best work being produced with cellphones. This issue, Amit Mehra speaks about the Roznaama of his life and how a cellphone camera was among one of the best things to happen to him.

Critiquing Exhibitions

Spaces that showcase photography are important as well as necessary. Each space has its own way of presenting an artist’s work, and each exhibition is as much a medium of expression as the photographs themselves. This time, we bring you a critical summation of the exhibitions that were shown at the third edition of the Delhi Photo Festival, along with look at Deepak Puri’s concise, yet emotional archive of photojournalism.

The Archives

Every issue, we’re going to be looking at an important historical personality from India or from the subcontinent and take a look at their life through archival images. In this issue, we take a look at the various Maharanis to have reigned over the Princely states of India, in an attempt to decode the fashion of the yesteryears.

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Features  Volume 1 Issue 1(Nov – Dec 2015)

Exploring the Masters of Photography

In each issue our attempt will be to appreciate the Masters with a fresh perspective, to serve the new generation something they may have missed out on amidst the chaos of online information. While our main focus will naturally be on the work of Indian and Asian photographers, we would also include Masters from across the world.

In the inaugural issue, we bring you a sample of the works of André Kertész, who inspired photographers like Henri Cartier-Bresson. Author and critic Geoff Dyer introduces Kertész and his Accordionists to our readers.

Amongst Indian Masters, we begin with Kishor Parekh, a legendary photojournalist, father to Swapan Parekh, who is an acclaimed photographer himself.

Highlighting Talent and Aesthetic

Contemporary, young photographers are the ones who are ultimately going to take the baton forward. And so, we are featuring three such promising names in this issue:
Marie-Claire Lacey, who delves into the issue of ‘mental illness’ with a photo series along with the inmates of an asylum in Dhaka.
Bharat Chaudhary, who attempts to capture the atmosphere of apprehension and fear surrounding Muslims living in countries outside India, like America and England, in the decade-long wake of terror attacks. This is particularly relevant, given the political and religious tensions in our country these days.
Chandan Gomes and his unique collaboration with the enigmatic A H Bano, which has resulted in a beautiful book of drawings and photographs.

Making Phoneographs

Yes, that’s what we call cellphone photographs! For every DSLR user, there are perhaps ten cellphone users who also take photography very seriously. Our aim is to showcase the best work being produced with cellphones. This issue, William Dalrymple, the noted Scottish historian and writer, art historian and curator, talks about making landscapes using his cellphone.

Frontline Report

In every issue of the magazine, we shall also keep a watch on the larger issues of our time. And so, we’re doing a special feature on the ongoing Syrian refugee crisis, where millions of displaced people are looking for a place to call home. We have Zacharie Rabehi, a young, independent photographer, who passed himself off as a refugee and walked with them along the Balkan Route and beyond.

We have an opinion piece looking at Nilüfer Demir’s image of Alan Kurdi and the impact it has had across the world.

And, in an exclusive feature, we have James Nachtwey, the photographer who has probably seen more wars than a soldier, talk about his observations regarding one of the biggest exoduses in human history.

The Archives

Every issue, we’re going to be looking at an important historical personality from India or from the subcontinent and take a look at their life through archival images. In this issue, we take a look at the Father of the Nation, Mahatma gandhi, through his grandnephew, Kanu Gandhi’s eyes

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